Sunday, October 07, 2007

Fragments

Wherein sitting in the lobbies at gymnastics and ballet I thought what a wonderful place for straight teenage boys to hang out with teenage girls, what with all the tight, physique revealing clothes and especially the intimate contact of ballet. Then I also thought that being straight teenage boys, and the struggle for certain mind over body concerns, that intimate contact while also wearing tight, physique revealing clothes could raise occassional issues

  • reader_iam (Done with Mirrors) links to the The Beiderbecke Affair. I'll link to his mix of cover songs that runs the gamut of ironic to earnest, whimsical to serious.
  • Even though the participation in 10 songs in 60 seconds was extremely disappointing, I've posted the answers.
  • In Separated by common visages I've figured out why Chick Fil A isn't open on Sundays.
  • Due to various threads at ALOTT5MA I've resolved to ignore all future posts (there and elsewhere) about the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame (The Replacements don't even make the nominating ballot? Scew you Cleveland and anyone and anything having to do with this scam) and Bruce Springsteen (being a nonbeliever). From Slate.com:
    Thirty years later, and largely thanks to Landau, Springsteen is no longer a musician. He's a belief system. And, like any belief system worth its salt, he brooks no in-between. You're either in or you're out. This has solidified Bruce's standing with his base, for whom he remains a god of total rock authenticity. But it's killed him with everyone else. To a legion of devout nonbelievers—they're not saying Bruuuce, they're booing—Bruce is more a phenomenon akin to Dianetics or Tinkerbell than "the new Dylan," as the Columbia Records promotions machine once hyped him. And so we've reached a strange juncture. About America's last rock star, it's either Pentecostal enthusiasm or total disdain.

  • Tosy and Cosh has revealed 99 of his top 100 movies.
  • Discussing the Zune scene I'm kinda incomprehensible.
  • I'm sure he's listened to it, so did I miss XWL reviewing the new Prince album or did it suck and he's ignoring it?
  • Saw Stardust, the movie. Loved it. Then read the Neil Gaiman book. Not that good. Every change the movie made improved the story.
  • Boston cops almost as bad as Illinois Nazis. At least as incompetent. Hyperbole much? Maybe a little.
  • Kid Creole & the Coconuts in L.A. (10/03/07). Would have loved to have seen that.
  • Tonight I will probably watch The Next Iron Chef. Michael Ruhlman was one of the judges.
  • Tim Minear's new project:
    "Miracle" -- from 20th Century Fox TV, where Minear and Holland are based with overall deals -- centers on a disgraced former televangelist, a man of no faith, who finds that God is using him to perform real miracles and change lives, starting with his own.

    "It's about losing everything and starting over and finding that there is a higher purpose in life," Minear said. "It's about a man who says, 'I don't know how to be good, but I'll try to be better.'

    Sounds like Steve Martin's ham-handed Leap of Faith. Or at least the final 10 minutes of the movie when it finally became something interesting. (via Instapundit)
  • I think I caught all the typos. Or most of them. This keyboard has always been crappy and most of this was written in the dark. Yes, I'm blaming the keyboard.
  • You light that pipe

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3 Comments:

Blogger XWL said...

In an alternate reality I hit publish on the review draft of Prince's Planet Earth that I typed up immediately after listening to the thing.

I wonder what other things are different in the alternate reality in which I posted that review?

(in the aftermath of that review, Mahmoud Ahmadenijad realized that his pursuit of a nuclear armed Iran was wrong-headed and began dismantling the program and opened up to real inspections, TV producers at ABC realized how awful Cavemen was going to be, and decided to save everybody some trouble killing the show before it even started, and after reading the review Jessica Alba realized that I was her soulmate, contacted me, and we are expecting our first child...)

As far as the album, I liked it, a lot, but that's a given. It's got elements of the good old school prince, some crappy Prince, and lot's of the current groovy, not always great, but generally enjoyable Prince.

Probably his best album of the 2000s, so far. I liked The Rainbow Children, Musicology, and 3121, but Planet Earth is a stronger album overall than any of those.

I bought it the first day it was out, and have been listening to it, and am not at all disappointed.

But when it comes to Prince, I'm an easy audience, and figured another gushing review of one of his albums was of little interest to anyone else.

10/07/2007 01:45:00 PM  
Blogger Icepick said...

And, like any belief system worth its salt, he brooks no in-between. You're either in or you're out.

Funny, I'm on neither side of this divide. I do think he's overrated (He'd have to be Jesus + Mozart + Woody Guthrie to equal the hype.), but I've liked a lot of his music. His fans, on the other hand, are just obnoxious, perhaps becaus they have that Pentacostal enthusiasm. But instead of beig high on God, they're high on a rock star.

10/08/2007 10:32:00 AM  
Blogger Callimachus said...

There is, of course, the ballet scene from "Top Secret"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FkiIsmFOWjI

10/08/2007 10:40:00 PM  

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